The is given consent, if the search follows

The fourth amendment of the United States Constitution protects human rights. I protects unreasonable searches and seizures, it requires law enforcement to have search warrants before entering a property (all warrants must have probable cause), it also protects against secret surveillance. The fourth amendment does not always protect against all searches and seizures, just ones that are unreasonable and done by government. “To claim violation of Fourth Amendment as the basis for suppressing a relevant evidence, the court had long required that the claimant must prove that he himself was the victim of an invasion of privacy to have a valid standing to claim protection under the Fourth Amendment” (https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/fourth_amendment). Warrentless searches are able to take place when an officer is given consent, if the search follows after an arrest, or if there is some probable cause, “and there is exigent circumstance calling for the warrantless search.  Exigent circumstances exist in situations where a situation where people are in imminent danger, where evidence faces imminent destruction, or prior to a suspect’s imminent escape.) (https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/fourth_amendment). To add, warrantless searches and seizures of properties is not illegal, not if the objects being searched/seized are in plain view. Abandoned properties or properties of open fields do not not need warrants and does not violate the fourth amendment. Some states however do now allow this.    This Amendment has had a very important impact on citizens rights. Without this amendment, government officials/police could walk straight into your home and search/seize anything they wanted to, without any probable cause at all. For no reason at all, they could wire tap your phones or watch your every move. Sure, maybe you have nothing to hide, however why would you ever feel comfortable with anyone just coming into your home or car whenever they felt like it? The Fourth Amendment does put a limitation on how fast an officer can find something, but its basic human rights. Whatever needs to be found, will be found when that warrant is signed, when that officer is given consent, or when that arrest is made.