SOCHUM- The Social, Cultural, and Humanitarian CommitteeTopic 1: Rights of Linguistic MinoritiesLinguistic- relating to a languageMinority- the smaller number of a group, usually less than halfWhat are Linguistic Minorities?-  A linguistic minority is a group of people that don’t speak the dominant language spoken by the majority.The dominant language is often referred to as the “Regional Language” There are many various types of linguistic minorities- They may be permanent residents or transitory. For example, in India, there are Malayalees living in Tamil nadu that speak Malayalam and vice versa https://www.linguisticsociety.org/sites/default/files/lsa-stmt-language-rights.

pdf (great site!)Topic 2: Brain DrainWhat is Brain Drain? the emigration of highly trained or intelligent people from a particular country.Almost 3% of the world’s population lives outside of their country of origin’s borders. Among these emigrants are many well educated and trained professionals. Its occurrence depends on a variety of factors, but broadly speaking, the term describes people trying to improve their living conditions by leaving their homes to find better prospects elsewhere.

This is especially true for developing countries, where many qualified people are attracted by better opportunities wealthier countries have to offer, but brain drain also occurs in other areas of the world. Is this phenomenon problematic?Exodus of skills and knowledge. Critics say that it is yet another way that developed countries take advantage of difficult conditions in some parts of the world; by luring away people who could otherwise be of big use in their home countries.

If the number of skilled people leaving is higher than that of people entering (the so-called brain gain), brain drain can become a challenge, especially if it hits the sensitive spots of a nation’s economy in sectors such as science, healthcare, or technology. Brain drain is not only a threat to developing countries though. In developed countries, the loss of skilled people does not only mean a poor economic investment in their education, but also the loss of large amounts of tax those high achievers would have paid during their professional career.Positive side effects. There is more than one side to the brain drain phenomenon though.

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First, expatriates are a vital source of income for many countries. According to the World Bank, remittances received by developing countries totalled up to US $325bn in 2010, more than doubling the US $129bn of aid raised by the OECD countries in the same year. In many cases, money sent home by expatriates contributes hugely to the GDP. Tajikistan is leading this statistic with more than a third of its GDP coming from remittances. On top of that, this private development aid seems to be a comparatively stable source of income.

When foreign investments dropped significantly due to the global economic crisis in 2009, remittances remained relatively stable, only dropping by 5.5% and recovering again in 2010.Another possibly positive aspect of global migration and the movement of skilled people is the so-called brain circulation. According to this concept, migration makes a vivid exchange of knowledge and ideas possible, which is beneficial for everyone contributing.

Considering all the complex facts, there is no easy answer for how to judge the brain drain phenomenon. Its influence seems to depend on a variety of factors that are not the same in all parts of the world. Keeping an eye on migration and its effects will be of major importance in the age of globalization.Visit advantages and disadvantages of brain drain google search optionsOn a positive note, the potential for emigration increases incentives for higher education. That is, people will study hard to become doctors, and while some will emigrate, some will stay in the home country and contribute to the home workforce. Another positive effect of healthcare migration is the generation of remittances. The World  Bank estimated  the total  remittance flow to developing countries  to  be $351  billion  in 2011, a sum that  totals three times the size of official development assistance supplied to developing countries.

In this way, international migration of healthcare workers boosts world income on an aggregate level and supplies resources to those living in poverty .People in the developed countries that see a lot of emigrations in the form of brain drain can feel lost in these circumstances. Most immigrants are willing to work at a lower salary than any resident of the country would, and this is a great opportunity for companies to hire people who are more than or just as skilled as their indigenous workforce and pay less for the same. This means that the practice of brain drain translates to lower number of job opportunities for the natives of a country, who have to work extra hard to outperform the people who are hired from other countries. This, in severe cases, might translate to widespread unemployment for indigenous residents of a country.From the perspective of a technologist, immigrants are our nation’s saving grace because our education system has been awful at the primary and secondary levels for a generation and no one has stepped up offering real solutions to fix it.better standards of living and quality of life, higher salaries, access to advanced technology and more stable political conditions in the developed countries attract talent from less developed areas.In 2000 almost 175 million people, were living outside their country of birth for more than a year.

Enormous numbers of skilled workers from developing countries have been induced to acquire their skills by the opportunity of high earnings abroad. This is why the Philippines, which sends more nurses abroad than any other developing country, still has more nurses per capita at home than Britain does. Quota system- (Maybe it can be some use) The quota system limits the number of immigrants entering Us each year  What motivates health worker migration? Push Factors Financial reasons Limited career opportunities Poor working conditions and management (corruption, limited resources, equip. etc.)Political instability, war, violencePull FactorsFinancial reasonsGreater career opportunitiesBetter opportunities for family (schooling, living conditions, etc.)Recruitment by destination countriesWays to stop Brain Drain Provide better job opportunities irrespective of caste, creed, race or nationality.

Promote people on merit alone.