Sirtaj the government of canada’s website- ‘The offenders

     Sirtaj KhroudMs. J. NasserCLU3M0January, 18, 2018Are restorative justice programs good for victims?If you were the victim of a serious crime would you rather never speak with your offender and have them go straight to prison or wherever else lawmakers decided, or get a chance to ask why the crime was committed, and choose what happens with the offender. For some people the thought of facing those that have caused serious problems in their lives is unbearable, but for those willing to do so, the potential benefits are great. Restorative justice is a response to crime that focuses on reconstructing the hurt and losses suffered by victims, holding offenders responsible for the impairment they’ve caused.  Restorative justice is in many ways positive for those affected by crime, it serves towards emotional justice in terms of mending the feeling of pain  and overcoming fear or hate, causes recidivism levels to decline,and lastly victims and communities are in charge of the outcomes of offenders which can have a positive effect on whole communities.Firstly, recidivism is declining due to the restorative justice system.This relates to victims as high recidivism levels are possibly what made them a victim in the first place. According to the following statistic found on the government of canada’s website- ‘The offenders who participated in the restorative justice program had lower recidivism rates than the matched group of probationers. With each year during the follow-up the differences in recidivism rates for the two groups widened. At the first year, the restorative justice offenders had a recidivism rate of 15% compared to 38% for the probation group. At the second year the respective rates were 28% and 54% and by the third year the rates were 35% and 66%.’. Analyzing this statistic in depth is quite clear that restorative justice is making an impact on recidivism rates in a positive manor. By the final period of conducting statistics (the third year) recidivism rates of restorative justice offenders were nearly half of the probational offenders. Restorative justice shows offenders the hurt and damage they´re causing to victims. This being compared to getting outright thrown into a jail cell is worse for offenders as they aren’t physically seeing the damage they are doing to victims and further feel no guilt. Once offenders are exposed to the kind of damage, hardship, and impairment they’re causing to victims it creates further an understanding of why these deeds should not be repeated or even committed in the first place. Secondly, restorative justice allows for those impacted by the hardships and negative emotions of crime to mend their criminal ways and avoid possible future misdemeanor through their understanding of why it is wrong instead of fear of punishment. Victims are given the opportunity to obtain information on why a certain crime was committed which in many cases can be a huge step in not onlyovercoming fear and hate, but also in alleviating the pain of reflecting on the past. The background of an offender prior to them committing the offence can also be reviewed and looked over by everyone involved in the crime. With victims being given an opportunity to confront those who’ve made negative impacts on their lives they’re given an opportunity to clarify why certain aspects were done. Based on an offenders reasoning and background how they’d like to treat them in terms of punishments and alternatives. Another thing to look at, if restorative justice were not a thing in today’s society, would be the new possibilities of revenge cases. Just three years ago a man by the name of Basil Borutski committed three murders in the first-degree out of past hatred, outrage, and built up anger. With restorative justice the chances of crimes like this ever occurring would be minimized as victims are given a chance to mend their issues and past controversy.Thirdly, victims and communities are in charge of the outcomes of offenders which can have a positive effect on whole communities. With the influence of restorative justice on communities everyone within a community is aware of what’s right and what’s wrong, this paves a great path for youth and past offenders, ensuring a society that grows to make better moral decisions. Specifically when it comes to determining the outcomes of offenders, restorative justice makes the most sense as there are numerous people of various backgrounds who have their own personal experience coming together to form the outcome of what should happen with the offender. Many factors are looked over including the seriousness of the crime to the main victim of the crime. Another thing that makes putting victims and communities in charge of restorative justice is that they can actually help in terms of re-offenders. A big thing that courts of law don’t take into account is that many offenders are stuck in a cycle of crime. An example of this can be a poor man that steals money for his family, he gets caught arrested then is put back on the streets once again with no money forcing him to re-offen. With restorative justice something like this would surely be taken into account, and with the restorative justice system there would be measures taken to help this particular person get back on his feet. In conclusion, restorative justice is far better than the traditional sentencing system, it serves towards emotional justice in terms of mending the feeling of pain  and overcoming fear or hate, causes recidivism levels to decline,and lastly victims and communities are in charge of the outcomes of offenders which can have a positive effect on whole communities. I believe that as a responsible citizen of Canada more should be done in terms of restorative justice, the benefits are amazing, and the outcomes even better. Works CitedGovernment of Canada, Correctional Service of Canada, Communications and Citizen Engagement Sector, Restorative Justice. “Key Messages on Restorative Justice.” Government of Canada, Correctional Service of Canada, Communications and Citizen Engagement Sector, Restorative Justice, 1 Sept. 2002, www.csc-scc.gc.ca/restorative-justice/003005-4005-eng.shtml.Government of Canada, Department of Justice, Electronic Communications. “Restorative Justice.” Government of Canada, Department of Justice, Electronic Communications, 27 Nov. 2017, www.justice.gc.ca/eng/cj-jp/rj-jr/index.html.Branch, Legislative Services. “Consolidated federal laws of canada, Youth Criminal Justice Act.” Legislative Services Branch, 4 Jan. 2018, www.laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/Y-1.5/index.html.”Restorative justice.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 13 Jan. 2018, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Restorative_justice.Government of Canada, Correctional Service of Canada, Communications and Citizen Engagement Sector, Restorative Justice. “Restorative Justice.” Government of Canada, Correctional Service of Canada, Communications and Citizen Engagement Sector, Restorative Justice, 21 Dec. 2016, www.csc-scc.gc.ca/restorative-justice/index-eng.shtml.”Circles of Support and Accountability (CoSA).” Mennonite Central Committee Canada, Mennonite Central Committee Canada, mcccanada.ca/learn/more/circles-support-accountability-cosa.Press, The Canadian. “Crown says Ontario man accused in triple murder case killed out of revenge.” National Post, 4 Oct. 2017, nationalpost.com/pmn/news-pmn/canada-news-pmn/revenge-motivated-ontario-man-accused-in-triple-murder-case-crown-alleges.