Profile of President Hello everyone! My name is Jane Chea and I currently go to Mont’Kiara International School as an eleventh grader. In this KLMUN XV conference, I will be serving as your President of the Disarmament and International Security Committee (DISEC) along with my Deputy President, Yelin. KLMUN XV will be my ninth conference overall and my third KLMUN.

Do use this research report to foster your research on the topic, however do not let it be the only document you reference. This report will act as a starting point for even more research that will strengthen your ideas which will influence your proposed resolutions and clauses. If you have any questions, feel free to contact me on my email at [email protected] of the Committee The Disarmament and International Security (DISEC) committee centers around the limiting and/or abolishing of weapons and global issues that pose a threat to the peace of international security.

The committee had been formed after World War II along with the formation of the United Nations (UN) with the League of Nations as the UN’s basis. DISEC is the UN’s first general assembly. The General Assembly as a whole, works towards creating and maintaining the cooperation and peace within nations in areas such as education, security, culture, health, social, and economic. Unlike the Security Council of the UN, DISEC does not have the power to authorize intervention of arms or impose sanctions therefore it’s resolutions cannot be binding.

Statement of the Problem The Democratic Republic of Korea (DPRK) has remained a major concern for the UN due to its isolation from the rest of the world, multiple human rights abuses within the country, and sporadic threats to peace. The DPRK was established and founded in 1948 after the Second World War when Japan surrendered the Korean peninsula and the Soviet Union and the United States took control of it, forming the DPRK and the Republic of Korea (ROK) respectively. This splitting of the Korean peninsula between the Communist Soviet Union and the Capitalist United States, set the stage for our current situation.

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Kim Il-sung had established the Communist Kim regime at the beginning of the Korean War with the help of the Soviet Union. Kim Jong-il, Kim Il-sung’s son, took power in 1994 and established a new policy of ‘Songun Chong’chi’ or military first, creating an even wider gap between the military and the elites with the majority of citizens. Despite improved international relations for the DPRK, reports began in the early 2000s that there were underground nuclear facilities and the likes despite Kim Jong-il’s pledge to abide to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), signed in 1995. The DPRK soon withdrew from the NPT and publicly announced their first underground nuclear test.

Today’s supreme leader, Kim Jong-un, succeeded his father, Kim Jong-il, in December 2011. Under Kim Jong-un’s regime, there were an increased amount of nuclear tests and heightened international tensions. In 2013, for example, the DPRK received sanctions from the UN Security Council and a formal protest from China, the DPRK’s major and main ally, due to a nuclear test. This, however, would not be the end of the DPRK’s nuclear tests and threats. The Current Situation Until today, the Kim family have maintained power in the DPRK by restricting the media, closing off into isolation (‘Juche’), and building a powerful military. Throughout 2017, tensions have escalated into what is known as the North Korean Crisis. The DPRK’s underground missile tests have not decreased despite sanctions from the UN and war threats by other nations.

The DPRK has claimed that it has already tested a long-range hydrogen bomb, much stronger and smaller than that of the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Within its arsenal and increasing amount of nuclear tests, it is possibly true that this nuclear superpower has missiles that could reach the US from Pyongyang. Furthermore, there are missiles pointed at the Republic of Korea (ROK) and Japan as many US troops are based there.

With so much at stake, there is little room for error. However, with the appointment of President Donald Trump in the US, tensions have increased between the two armed nations. President Trump has promised to enter in a war with the DPRK if anything the nation does threatens the US or its allies. The DPRK, however, is not threatened by the US and is willing and eager to counter its adversary through threats and war. The DPRK’s neighbors, South Korea and Japan, are concerned over the potential of an outbreak in nuclear war and the effects their countries will face. Japan in particular, have taken measures to practice emergency evacuations and plans for when airports become inoperable during war, for their citizens.However, as of January 2018, the DPRK and ROK are scheduled to have talks, the first in two years. On January 4th, 2018, the DPRK also opened its military crisis hotline to the ROK which lowers the chance of an accidental war.

Furthermore, the DPRK plans to send a team to the Winter Olympics held in the ROK on February 9th, 2018 as well as agreeing to march under the flag of the Korean Peninsula with the ROK. Recently, the US has increased their military presence by moving more airships and naval units towards the Pacific Ocean. It has also been reported that the US’ troops have been training, and putting the US’ actions together, North Korea could be threatened at these very specific signs of war.Relevant International Actions/Past UN efforts The DPRK along with the ROK, joined the UN in 1991.

The UN has enforced numerous sanctions on the DPRK and has since strengthened them. In November 2016, the UN aimed to cut the DPRK’s imports of coal by 60 per cent. Regardless of the sanctions and treaties imposed on the DPRK, it still chooses to ignore them and continue its nuclear testing. Furthermore, its main and major ally, China, had even clearly expressed its unsupportive view of the DPRK advancing its arsenal. Along with expressing disapproval, China has deliberately cut off export of certain items that could aid in nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons.

It has even cut off imports of coal, minerals, and seafood from the DPRK as part of implemented sanctions.In this North Korean Crisis, the US has also contributed to the escalating tensions. Threats and rhetorics have been thrown around between the two nations yet there has been little physical engagement between the two nations despite the US’ North Korea policy of “maximum pressure and engagement”.

The US had submitted a UN-resolution calling for even tougher sanctions on the DPRK after the country in question sent a hydrogen bomb flying over mainland Japan and into the waters. Despite this, in January 2018, there has been a meeting held in Vancouver, Canada where officials from around twenty countries will meet and discuss their plan of action to stop the DPRK’s nuclear program.Possible Solutions There have been many attempted solutions to prevent a global nuclear war and to limit the proliferation of nuclear weapons in the DPRK. China is the main and major ally to the DPRK. Despite their alliance, China has express their clear disapproval of the DPRK’s actions regarding nuclear testing. Though China has a defensive treaty with Pyongyang, China’s stance is uncertain if a global nuclear war does break out. On one end, as a global superpower would not want, China does not want a nuclear-armed DPRK as it poses a large threat. On the other hand, the disintegration of the DPRK would lead to North Korean refugees flooding into China and increased influence from the US in the Korean Peninsula.

There is much needed dialogue between the US and the DPRK if tensions are to de-escalate from where they stand. Many countries agree to this dialogue, such as the Russian Federation, but is concerned over the lack of cooperation and the resulting to threats from the US. Seeing as the US and the DPRK are considered nuclear superpowers, war between them is unlikely but dangerous. In fact, dialogue must be held with the DPRK and the international body in general, to lower tensions and address issues that affect citizens on a global-scale.BibliographyBBC News. “North Korea Country Profile.

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