Care values

Care values are standards and codes of practice that identify moral rights of service users. These are set by the general social care council in ability to make service users feel valued.

Care values are important to work supportively. These include understanding the importance of diversity and cultural variation, maintaining confidentiality and promoting the rights of service users. It is important that these care skills are put into practise when working with a service user in order to make them feel valued; rather than just knowing the right skills.

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Maintaining service user’s confidentiality is considered a cornerstone of the counseling profession, and should be guarded at extreme costs. This is a right all service users have. Establishing trust between care workers and service users is vital in being successful.

Service users need to feel they can trust a care worker to keep their personal information to themselves. This demonstrates respect for service users, helping them to promote trust, and helps them to feel valued and to maintain their self esteem. If they do not feel like they can trust the service user, they are more likely to be honest within their answers. It is possible that a service user’s safety may be put at risk if their personal details are shared; therefore there are legal requirements to keep personal records confidential.

If the service user has a good relationship with a care worker and feels they are able to talk to them in confidence, this would make the service user feel protected and valued. This could enable them to overcome any problems they may be experiencing.

In an early year setting, information about children and their families must never be shared with others without permission from the family; except in the interest of protecting a child. If a care worker feel the child’s wellbeing is in jeopardy they have a responsibility to protect the child in any way possible. In this case, information is only released if the care worker thinks the child’s life or someone else’s is in risk or if the child gives consent to do so.

Children learn faster in their early years therefore it is important that foundations are layed for their abilities, characteristics and skills later in life. Children should be offered a wide range of support in their development, followed up by several reports on reaching their stages; of which should be kept confidential with exception of the parents.