Brown Board of Education of Topeka

In Topeka, Kansas, a African third-grader named Linda Brown had to walk a mile through a railroad yard to get to her black elementary school, even though a white elementary school was only seven blocks away. Linda’s father, tried to enroll her in the white elementary school, but the principal of the school refused. Brown went to McKinley Burnett, the head of Topeka’s branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and asked for help. The NAACP was eager to assist the Browns, as they had wanted to challenge segregation in public schools.

Other black parents gladly Joined Brown in challenging the public school. In 1951 the NAACP requested an injunction that would ban the segregation of Topeka’s public schools. The U. S. District Court of Kansas heard Brown’s case. At the trial, the NAACP argued that segregated schools sent the message to black children that they were indifferent to whites. The Board of Education’s defense was that, segregated schools imply prepared black children for the segregation they would face during adulthood.

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The board also argued that segregated schools were not neccessarily harmful to black children; great African Americans such as Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington, and George Washington Carver had overcome more than Just segregated schools to achieve what they achieved.

14th Amendment guaranteed the rights of citizenship to all persons born or naturalized in the United States, this decision overturned the Plessy v. Ferguson case in 1896. Plessy v. Ferguson was when a Louisiana law required to separate seating for African American citizens on the railroad. I do not agree with any kind of segregation, we are all people and should be treated equally. Our skin color does not define the way we should be treated, what defines the way we should be treated is our character. Ruled in favor of Brown by finding that racial segregation in public schools was unconstitutional. The decision was an historic ruling regarding segregation of public places.