During the past four weeks I had an opportunity to view the following three simulations: “Identifying Ethical Differences in Cultures” (UOP Resource, 2003), “Analyzing Ethical Issues in Marketing” (UOP Resource, 2003), and “Keeping Information Confidential” (UOP Resource, 2003).

The purpose was to see if my personal values changed any because of these learning experiences. Although the simulations and my personal learning experiences have broaden my perspective with ethical issues, I do not feel that my personal values have changed in any way regarding on how I would go about making decisions in my personal and professional life.My top personal values (honesty, integrity, respect, loyalty, and caring) are in fact strengthening even further.

Change in Personal Values after Learning Experiences Without a doubt the three simulations presented in class provide great examples on real life situations that we often face on a personal and professional environment. These simulations provide a nice history with a timeline on how I made decisions and the impact on the consequences. So did these simulations and learning experiences change my views on personal values?The fact is that they made me brainstorm and forced me to do critical thinking since the decisions that had to be made had a direct consequence on a person or an organization as a whole. So looking back into the “Keeping Information Confidential” (UOP Resource, 2003) simulation I would like to address some of the very interesting questions provided by our instructor: Is it fair to consider information gathered from informal sources and by accident?I am sure that there some situations which could be debatable and put me to think that it may be appropriate to do so but for the most part I do not think that it is fair to a person or an organization.

One example which comes to mind is a recent hiring situation in my place of work. One of my roles is to be the hiring coordinator for the district, and as such, I deliver technical phone screen interviews to internal and external candidates which may be interested in the position. Recently I received the resume for an external candidate which possessed the qualifications which I was looking for so I scheduled him for an interview.Prior to this candidate coming in I was approached by one of my peers who had worked with this candidate years ago and told me that hiring him would be a big mistake.

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In short, I was told that this candidate had stolen intellectual property from one of his previous employers and that although he never got caught, he was not an honest individual. Was this information fair for me to consider? It put me in a very awkward situation but after much thought I went ahead and brought him in for the interview anyway.The reason is that this was second hand information which I did not for a fact was true. In fairness to the candidate there might have been a personal conflict between him and my peer years ago and my peer might have been looking for a way to not bring him on board. Not knowing the real facts I followed my conscience and brought him in for the interview. Although he ended up not getting the job because of some technical scenarios which he failed to answer correctly, I cared about knowing more about this candidate because of his qualifications.

I gave him the benefit of the doubt.So is it possible to ignore information, irrespective of its source? I do not think so. If it is a credible source such as a human resources department telling me information about an employee or a direct supervisor sharing the facts about one of his ex-employees which now wants to join my organization it would be very hard not to ignore it. On the other hand if the information came from a source that was not close or credible I would likely ignore it and not consider it towards making a decision.

This is an integrity issue which I was raised with.Handling information when you are not sure of its accuracy could be damaging for both an employee and the organization. On the example cited above regarding the external candidate which was seeking a job, I was never certain that he had stolen intellectual property from his previous employer. His references were strong, his experience managing people and processes seemed top notch and he seemed to be the right fit.

I ended up giving him the benefit of the doubt and brought him in for the interview but not without putting him in very tough scenarios to understand his integrity and honesty.In addition I had also lined up his personal references as the next step to take (had he passed the interview) and had planned to request that he provide professional references as well. I believe that it is my responsibility to make sure that information that is given to me is validated; otherwise I will not consider it towards taking a decision.

Conclusion Personal values are applied directly and indirectly in my personal and professional environment.Taking this course and having the opportunity to view very real life simulations has given me the opportunity to reflect upon them and reiterate the fact that my personal values have strengthen even further. I also believe that what may be acceptable to one person may not be for another (particularly in different cultures). Being open minded while listening to different perspectives allows me to realize how people apply their personal values and how they may coincide or differ from mine. Ultimately though, most of us want to do what’s right for our society.