The Forestry Commission a non-ministerial government department responsible for forestry in Great Britain (Forestry Commission, 2009). The forestry commission is a flexible and adaptable organisation (Mark, 2005). The Forestry Commission manages 7,720 square kilometres of land in Great Britain, the majority of which (60%) is in Scotland, 26% of the landholding is in England and the remainder in Wales (The Times 100, 2009).

The forestry commission Plants more than 17 million trees every year.The Forestry Commission has always placed operating in a ‘green’ manner top of its agenda. The forestry commission is established in 1919 during the First World War. On 1 September 1919 the Forestry Act came into force (Forestry Commission, 2009). This set up the Forestry Commission and gave it responsibility for woods in England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland. Eight Forestry Commissioners were charged with promoting forestry, developing forestation, the production of timber, and making grants to private landowners.They met for the first time in November under Chairman Lord Lovat. The first Commission trees were planted on 8 December 1919 at Eggesford Forest, Devon.

Forestry commission started to use their Northerwood House as a Training Centre in 1971 (Forestry Commission, 2009). A 2 year New Entrant Training Scheme was launched in 1970 and a new Management Training Centre opened in the Forest of Dean in 1973. By the 1990s the Commission was committed to multi-purpose forestry (The Times 100, 2009).

The woods being planted and managed today will show the evidence well into the 21st century (Forestry Commission, 2009). The Mission of Forestry Commission is to protect and expand Britain’s forests and woodlands and increase their value to society and the environment (Forestry Commission, 2009). Forestry Commission take the lead, on behalf of all three administrations, in the development and promotion of sustainable forest management (Mark, 2005).As Forestry Commission deliver the distinct forestry policies of England, Scotland and Wales through specific objectives drawn from the country forestry strategies, there is a chance that their mission and values may be different in each (The Times 100, 2009). According to Benneett ; Graham (1989), Armstrong ; Baron (2004) and Price (2008), functions of human resources department like recruitment, selection, assessment, performance and reward plays a vital role behind the success of any organization.The objective of this project is to find out ; critically evaluate the different functions of HR department like recruitment, selection, assessment, performance and reward at Forestry Commission behind the success of this firm. Human Resources department at Forestry Commission determine the future human resource needs relative to Forestry Commission’s strategic plan and take necessary actions to meet those needs in a timely manner (Personnel Today, 2008).

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Sources: Armstrong & Baron (2004) The human resources planning process at Forestry Commission is almost similar to the process suggested by Price (2008).Those processes are job analysis, workforce planning, recruitment and selection, training, performance appraisal and compensation. Job analysis is the process of gathering and analysis job-related information. This includes details about tasks to be performed as part of a job and the personal qualities required to do them. Job analysis process is divided into two parts (Price, 2007). job specification is related to identifies the knowledge, skills, abilities, and other employee characteristics needed to perform a job.Two types of forecasting have to be done by any organizations Human Resources Department (Graham & Bennett, 1989).

One of them is demand forecasting which is related to determining the number of employees that the organization will need at some point in the future as well as the knowledge, skills and abilities that these employees must possess (Price, 2008). Another one is supply forecasting which is related to determining what human resource will be available, both inside and outside the organization (Graham & Bennett, 1989).